Inside/Outside SW

IOSW_September2010_Cisco“The Madness and Memories of Cisco, Utah”
It is not a ghost town.If you listen closely, there’s a faint pulse. And if you stay long enough, the quiet cadence may even erupt into a car chase or conflagration. Amidst the shadows of memory in Cisco, Utah, there are new stories in the making. more…
IOSW_August2010_Immigration“Scars: The Impacts of Crossing the Border”
It is a mass migration, and it leaves its mark. For more than a decade, they have poured across the border in numbers too staggering to assess. They have pounded thousands of miles of trails into the desert floor… more…
IOSW_June2010_Couch_Surfing“Couch Surfing the Canyons”
It is a stretch of river that allows for intense introspection, a dive into one’s sense of self and purpose that corresponds with the deepening of the canyon. This is especially true when the last beer can is crumpled and sandy in the bottom of the canoe… more…
IOSW_May2010_Strength“Strength”
That spring and summer, I didn’t know the why or how of it. I simply knew I needed to be strong. It was a knowing from deep within. A knowing before and beyond words. A knowing like instinct. more…
IOSW_April2010_Sustainable_Empowerment“Sustainable Empowerment: Renewable Energy and the Navajo Nation”
Vastness. Endless expanses. With both small and large human imprints on the landscape. Tiny, rickety trailers are buffeted by incessant winds – off-the-grid satellites unto themselves. more…
February 2010 cover“The Best Mardi Gras Party This Side of New Orleans”
Sex appeal. Wild and daring feats of ingenuity and immorality. A flair for the utterly glamorous and hopelessly ridiculous. Debauchery and thrills. No longer is New Orleans sole proprietor of such Mardi Gras elements. more…
January 2010pg1“Listening to Non-Native Voices: Seeing Invasive Species in a New Light”
Charred and skeletal tamarisk lines the highways paralleling the Colorado River near Moab. The scene resembles a warzone – and, in essence, it is. more…

IOSWDec09pg1“Paradox Valley, Colorado: The Half-Life of Belonging”
It is an expansive landscape, one that dwarfs the tiny communities it cradles.  Two thousand-foot red cliffs frame a valley floor of alternating sage and range. Utah’s La Sal Mountains tower above the west end of the valley… more…
InsideOutsideOct09pg1“Confluence: A Celebration of Reading and Writing in Moab”
For a second year in a row, the redrock rimmed valley of Moab will cradle a gathering of literary greats in observance of the ever-expanding community of readers and writers. more…
InsideOutsideOct09pg1“The Migration of Heartache: Moab’s Tailings Pile and the Men Who Moved It”
Upon my arrival, every flat surface in Gary Hazen’s small trailer is stacked with the remnants of his efforts: correspondence, newspaper clippings, government documents, reports, receipts from the thousands of letters he sent certified mail, and more. more…
Aug2009Cover“Moab’s Free Meal: Connection and Community Through Food”
Spaghetti noodles. Bamboo shoots. Arugula. Bok choy. Whole roasted chickens. Celery. A can of green beans. These are Katherine Hunter’s raw materials. When I arrive, she has them lined up on her counter. more…
InsideOutside-May2009pg1“Seeking Truth in a Monkeywrench”

On March 21, 1981, modern-day monkeywrenching was born. With the changing of the season, upstart organization Earth First! ushered in a new era of environmental activism by “cracking” Glen Canyon Dam. more…
InsideOutsideFeb09pg1“Green River and the Great Nuclear Debate”
Main Street is quiet. Restaurants, service stations and hotels are shuttered. Ray’s Tavern, a river-rat mecca, offers the only breath of life in downtown Green River. The town known as “Utah’s Desert Treasure” doesn’t have much shine these days. more…
cover“Moab Publisher Heads Down Under with the Zephyr”
“I can sum up the Zephyr in one word . . . crap.”
This rave review of the Canyon Country Zephyr came courtesy of Jimmie Walker, former Grand County (Moab, Utah) Commissioner. more…
COVERfinalwlogo“Moab 2058”
Remember when, not so very long ago, Moab was treated as a commodity? When this redrock landscape was valued as a resource – for minerals, for oil, and for luring hordes of tourists with open pocketbooks – rather than as a home? more…
cov_aug“Where the Hell is Hanksville?”
Despite its remote location, Hanksville, Utah, has always been on the road to somewhere. In the early days, horse and cattle rustlers passed through, taking their loot to Colorado markets. It was a place of rest for the Wild Bunch outlaws. more…
 
cover_june08“Lighting the Way: Communities on the Cusp of a New Energy Future”
Approaching Moab from the north, motorists discover the breathtaking entry portal of Moab Canyon. As a local, I never tire of the deep maroon of the Cutler redbeds, the exposed jumble of strata that is the Moab Fault, nor the Wingate cliffs… more…
cover_2“Salvation Through Service”
They built 23,000 miles of hiking trails, 125,000 miles of new roads, and 47,000 bridges. They stocked one billion fish in waterways nationwide, strung 89,000 miles of telephone lines, and erected 3,470 fire towers. more…
08_jan_feb_cover“Moab at a Crossroads”
The hike in from this end of the canyon requires some desert-rat ingenuity: ledge-leaping, crack-finding, and a belly-to-rock shimmy that brings me eye-to-eye with lizards and pack-rat deposits. The canyon bottom is solid ground well earned. more…
07nov_dec_cover“Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf…and Why?”
In 1998, with hopes bigger than their fears, individuals with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released wolves on the Arizona-New Mexico border. This was the culminating moment of a reintroduction effort two decades in the making. more…
07oct_nov_cover“For the Love of Glen Canyon”
Fifty years ago, Hollywood starlet Katie Lee fell hopelessly in love with Glen Canyon. Then followed the dam, the drowning of the river, and Katie’s reservoir of grief. Yet, a passionate activism was born out of this loss… more…
IOSW-AprilMay06-1“Inner Gorge Metaphors: An Artist’s Perspective of the Grand Canyon”
In Inner Gorge Metaphors: An Artist’s Perspective of the Grand Canyon, painter Serena Supplee employs the Colorado River as a metaphor for her life path and suggests that all of us can learn from its movements… more…